Sponsor a Nurse

Become a Nurse Sponsor today and help our nurses bring vital care and support to those who need it.

Our nurses are the beating heart of Phyllis Tuckwell Hospice Care.

Every hour of every day, 365 days a year, one of our nurses is looking after someone who might be facing the last few weeks, days, or even hours of life. To become a Nurse Sponsor we ask for a donation of £25 a month – enough for us to pay for an hour of nursing care.

Our Nurses offer expert, compassionate care for our patients and their families – at the Hospice in Farnham, the Beacon Centre in Guildford, in the community and in patients’ own homes. As well as providing medication and treating the physical symptoms of illness, they also spend time talking to and getting to know our patients as individuals, making sure that they are treated with dignity and respect, and that their final wishes are listened to and fulfilled. They really do become part of the family, for families who need support at this difficult time.

But our nurses depend on the generosity of people like you to do their job. By becoming a Nurse Sponsor, you would make a real, immediate difference to people living with an advanced or terminal illness.

Alternatively download the form and return to Phyllis Tuckwell Hospice Care, Waverley Lane, Farnham, Surrey, GU9 8BL or call Fundraising on 01252 729446 if you have any questions or if you would like to sign up over the phone.

 

Jessie works in our Hospice Care at Home team, visiting patients who have chosen to die at home, and supporting their families too.

“For some people, the most important thing is to be at home when they take their last breath, and helping them in this wish is really special,” says Jessie. “You can see the difference you’re making. People know that we’re specialists and our being there helps them relax. They know that they can always contact us if they need to.”

One of the patients whom Jessie has recently cared for is Maggie.

“I met Maggie about a month before she died. Any time she was worried, just talking with her would put her at ease. Being that confidante is a privilege, it’s really special.”

“Jessie played a big part in my life over the last stages of Mum’s illness,” says Maggie’s daughter, Zoe. “She is kind and caring, with a heart of gold. Her care, professionalism and compassion were outstanding, not only to Mum but to the whole family.”